Reviewed: PreSonus Studio 1824

Link Audio | linkaudio.com.au | Expect To Pay: $699

I don’t know about all of you reading this, but I for one have been using PreSonus hardware in some form or another in my one personal recording setup for the last decade. This does not mean I’m biased in any way. I don’t favour this brand over others just because I have used their products, but I have definitely found certain PreSonus devices offered me a solution that I could not find elsewhere. That said, I don’t use PreSonus for my main audio interface; however, I have tested and tried just about every model that has been released in the last ten years. It’s not become my main interface purely because my system is based around another specific piece of hardware.

This does not devalue what PreSonus has to offer in any way. Their products have proven year after year to offer quality and control to meet certain uses and price points for a range of operations. So, I always enjoy giving a new PreSonus interface a test run when it lands on my desk. I know this much before even opening the box; this is going to be a painless experiment. They are well designed units that integrate seamlessly with whatever computer system I choose to run them with, so I know even before setting up the Studio 1824 audio interface that it will be a joy to play with.

 

Now that it’s taken me about as long as the kettle took to boil in order to get this unit setup, it’s easy to see why I enjoy using PreSonus products. There are no lengthy installation procedures that have you emailing tech support just to get your new interface recognised by your computer. It’s pretty straightforward, and you’re up and running and set to go in a big way. This is designed to be the central hub of what can ultimately be a larger recording setup with added peripherals. You get eight analogue inputs, either mic or line on XLR/TRS connectors, and eight analogue outputs on TRS. There are two separate master outputs and two headphone outputs too. Add to this SP/DIF, eight channels of ADAT in and out, MIDI in and out and Word Clock, and you have a pretty serious basis for a major recording setup.

 

Loaded with Presonus’ DMAX microphone preamps and offering up to 24-bit/192kHz audio recording, this is more than just your beginner’s interface. But even if you are just starting out and want to do it on a scale that will allow you to grow, the Studio 1824 comes bundled with a range of software options in order to get you going. You get PreSonus Studio One Artist DAW software included with the unit, along with a host of plug-ins from Arturia, Lexicon and more.

 

If you’re looking for high quality preamps included in your audio interface and want to be able to record up to eight microphones at once without shelling out big bucks or needing added hardware, then this might be the interface for you. Easy to install and easy to operate with solid construction and a sleek design, PreSonus have delivered again in their complete range of audio interfaces for all levels.

Hits and Misses

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High I/O on a single rack spaced device

Great sounding mic preamps

Plenty of bundled software

Very easily set up and expanded if needed

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