TC ELECTRONIC UNVEIL EIGHT NEW PEDALS

The New Analogue Armada Range

TC Electronic certainly don’t do things by halves, announcing this morning they’ll be releasing not one but eight new pedals as part of their new Analogue Armada range.

These stompboxes are divided into three sections: ‘Dreadnought Dirtboxes’ for gain (overdrive, fuzz, and metal distortion), ‘Creatures of the Deep’ modulations (chorus, tremolo, and octaver), and a pair of ‘Dynamic Gentlemen’ to provide auto-swell and noise-gate. Here are some of the key features of each pedal:

 

EL MOCAMBO OVERDRIVE

Give your tone some more substance with gritty mid-range sounds. This particular pedal is advertised as being best suited to blues solos or hard rock settings.

HONEY POT FUZZ

Stacks of volume and a great range of gain is the essence of the Honey Pot Fuzz. Generate anything from overdrive-esque sounds to distortion with lasting sustain.

EYEMASTER METAL DISTORTION

If you’re looking for an overdrive that’s anything but subtle, this could be the pedal for you. Designed to channel the tone of Swedish death metal, the Eyemaster celebrates traditional metal themes of loud volume and high gain.

3RD DIMENSION CHORUS

A full, lush, clean tone reminiscent of sounds of the 80's, this pedal gives you a three-dimensional feel with just four preset buttons.

CHOKA TREMOLO

Features a three-knob layout to adjust your tone as you please, allowing you to create subtle modulation effects with ease.

NETHER OCTAVER

Channel retro sounds with the Nether Octaver and its ability to create synth tones akin to arcade games of decades gone by. According to TC Electronic, this pedal would also work quite well for a cover of Prince’s ‘When Doves Cry’ solo.

CRESCENDO AUTO SWELL

Bringing an iconic and rare effect to your pedalboard without the exorbitant costs usually associated with such sought-after products.

IRON CURTAIN NOISE GATE

Achieve a high-quality, pure tone with this classic noise gate that employs intuitive, simple controls to ensure signal pollution isn’t an issue. 

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