Reviewed: Warwick Teambuilt Pro Series Corvette

Amber Technology | ambertech.com.au | Expect to Pay: $2999

I remember growing up and seeing players like Norwood Fisher (of Fishbone fame), Stuart Zender and Aussie guns like Craig Newman playing these basses that had slightly different shapes, a square-ish kind of headstock and a distinct fat and rumbly, yet articulate tone. I was always intrigued by their sound and looks. Upon learning they were Warwick basses made in Germany, some additional mystique was added to my perception of the brand (in the fact that they weren’t the standard US-styled instruments). Instantly recognisable in looks and with a highly identifiable sound, Warwick have since continued to make quality instruments that are used by a huge range of players worldwide.

Made in Germany, the Teambuilt Pro Series Corvette has that distinct Warwick look that we all know and love. The Pro series is a Warwick initiative designed to offer a German-made instrument at a lesser price than their Custom Shops. A double cutaway, rounded horns and flowing body shape give the Corvette its looks, which Warwick also utilise their now classic bubinga body, ovangkol neck and wenge fretboard. The grain and look of the woods (the neck especially) really are great, with the natural satin finish allowing the timbers to stand out. The fretboard is a 20” radius with jumbo nickel-silver frets, and the lack of inlays adds to the natural look of the instrument. With a 34” scale length, this Corvette should suit a range of players. Although it is a slightly weighty instrument, it sits comfortably with a strap or sitting down.

 

I must also give a nod to the much improved Warwick RockBag gig bag (which comes included). This iteration is much sturdier, uses seemingly tougher materials, has added pockets and storage and is more of a fitted model with thick padding to protect the instrument.

 

 

The Pro Series Corvette definitely allows for speedy access right across the fretboard. The neck shape is comfortable and the cutaways let you dig into the higher registers with absolute ease. Traditional single coil tones can be dialled in, with the bridge pickup allowing for more aggressive, edgy nuances. Pick, slap and finger styles are all fair game and the MEC pickups have long been a Warwick staple for good reason.

 

The Corvette body has a nice weight to it that feels like you’re holding an instrument, but isn’t back breaking, while the neck has some size but isn’t overly cumbersome.   Warwick instruments definitely have a feel and a sound, and that’s something that isn’t always so in today’s increasingly populated instrument space. It’s a welcome change.

Hits and Misses

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Build quality

Neck, upper fret access

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Weight might deter some players

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