REVIEWED: THE BLUE SNOWBALL STUDIO USB MICROPHONE

Amber Technology | ambertech.com.au | Expect To Pay: $199

Blue Microphones have grown a reputation for delivering recording tools that look a little unusual. They have shocked us so many times with their inspiring designs that most of their new releases don’t seem that unusual at all. The Snowball Studio has the team at Blue trying to get our attention once again, but carries that Blue promise of also sounding great.

Designed with podcasting, webcam, vocal and instrumental use in mind, the Snowball Studio is ready to be used on your desktop without the need of additional cables or stands. It comes with a nifty little tripod stand that looks just as cool as the microphone itself, and is set up in a matter of moments with just a USB cable needed to power the device and send audio to your computer. The ‘ball’ itself can be easily rotated on the tripod stand. It can be angled up and down with about a 90 degree coverage, which is more than ample for any use on a desktop. This means you can sit back with a guitar and capture the instrument’s full body, or you can angle it up for vocals when sitting closer with the microphone in front of you. A switch on the rear of the unit allows three choices, combining polar pattern and input level, allowing you to choose between cardioid, omni, or cardioid pattern with a 10dB pad applied. For vocals, instrument and interview use, this just about covers anything you need.

 

You are getting a complete package as the preamp and audio converters are built into the housing and besides the required USB cable, you also get a copy of PreSonus’ Studio One Artist software. The large diaphragm capsule sounds great with very little room noise captured when using the cardioid and pad option. This makes it ideal for those working in less than ideal acoustics. If you want a simple solution for recording acoustic guitar and vocals - as well as a host of other instruments - this can do the job. It also makes your voice recordings for video and podcasts sound unbelievably good. Why let the world listen to you with poor audio quality? If you want to be heard, be heard well. 

 

Hits and Misses

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It looks cool

Easy setup and positioning

Great sound with little effort

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I wasn’t a fan of the plastic housing

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